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Race Report- Ealing Half Marathon 2022

Happy 10th Birthday to the fabulous Ealing Half Marathon! Number one was set up to coincide with the 2012 London Olympics and has run every year since. Every year apart from one – in 2020 no race took place in real life, but there was a virtual run which I undertook on a very cold and wet day in Suffolk. I just re read that post, and oh my it was a very different experience from the one today! For a start it never seems to rain on the last Sunday in September in Ealing! The weather today was perfect for running – sunny, blue skies and not too hot.

Bright and sparky and ready to run!
Waiting at the start we found ourselves a bit too close to the 2 hour pacer for comfort so hung back a bit! All the Xempo pacers were women. Apparently the 2:05 pacer ran a half last week in 1:25 😳

As usual I knew quite a few people taking part, and also lots of the volunteers and supporters along the route. It’s always fun looking out for friends. It’s a while since I ran alongside another person (I mean apart from the crowd) but today my son Jack decided at the very last minute to take part. Later he told me that this was the only the 5th actual run he’s done in two years! So he was basically running on no specific training at all. Crazy. But it was very nice to have the company, and the encouragement. He set his fancy watch with a target of 2 hours and 5 minutes – ambitious. The first half we were on track and I managed the fastest 10km I’ve done for years! But after that the second half began to take its toll on our legs. There’s a point where the route goes quite close to our house – and his – and it is hard to run past that point when your legs are screaming STOP!

Race village atmosphere

But the fantastic support from the crowd, offering jelly babies, water and general cheering really does give you a boost. There is also plenty of music and drums along the way, with the Hanwell Ukelele Group smashing out tunes, and a fab dhol player outside the Sikh temple on Drayton Bridge Road. Click here if you don’t know what a dhol is! There were also some great drummers on the Uxbridge Road which was a great energising sound to hear at mile 12.

Happy – but knackered. We did it though!

As always superb organisation and a huge army of volunteers of all ages from Beavers to seniors made this a fantastic event, enjoyed by everyone.

Jack and I finished in 2 hours and 7 minutes. Hurray! He wouldn’t have done it if I hadn’t done it, and I certainly wouldn’t have done it that quick without him, and his ambitious target! At the end my feet, legs and back were killing me, I’m not going to lie. However, after a long soak in a hot bath and an extremely good Sunday lunch at The Green W7 in Hanwell I am feeling ok, if a little tired.

Shout out to Race Directors Sandra Courtney and Christina O’Hare. As usual you have done an amazing job. And thanks of course to the founder of Ealing Half Marathon Kelvin Walker, without whom this wonderful race would have never existed. If you have never thought about doing a half marathon then start thinking about doing this one next year!

Lovely anniversary medal – and made from wood too for extra save the planet points.
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Running tales from Ealing – and beyond!

This morning the weather was a lot cooler than it has been for the last few days – much more conducive to a long run than a few days ago, when it took me nearly an hour and a half to run 10km! My intention was to do between 11 and 16 km, depending on how my legs felt ( I had a late night last night, and there might have been a little alcohol involved!). But it was really such a beautiful morning I ended up in Richmond! So the round trip was about 20km. Nice and slow though, and including a couple of chat stops along the way.

The Thames at Isleworth

The canal was busy with bird life today. The baby moorhens and cygnets are getting bigger and more independent. It’s lovely to see a swan family of 5 swimming along sedately. At the river there were a lot of geese, ducks and swans napping along the slipway while the tide was in.

Richmond Lock and Footbridge

The towpath was busy with humans – walking, running, cycling, scooting and wheeling, next to a river where the activity continued in rowing boats, skiffs, paddle boards and canoes. I didn’t see anyone swimming today!

One of the things I really noticed today was the smell of summer. The linden (lime) trees have been smelling amazing this past week, and this mixed and flowed along with the scent of roses, jasmine and philadelphus.

Of course the sight of all these flowers was also wonderful, and stopping to look at them, to really notice them, was a lovely way to slow down, and give my legs a bit of a break!

I was wearing my new Ealing half marathon running t shirt today, which prompted a chat at Richmond with another runner! She’s also training for the Ealing half which happens at the end of September. It’s the 10 year anniversary this year – it started in 2012, inspired by the London Olympics. I’ve done them all except one (☹️) and can honestly say it’s one of the friendliest, most fun and best organised half marathons you can ever do. It’s always more fun when there’s lots of people – so if you haven’t already then sign up! Even if you have never done one before there’s plenty of time to start training! Click the link above to go the website. Go on – you know you really want to!

View up river towards Twickenham bridge and Richmond

I bumped into a friend on the way back, and stopped for a quick chat – and was able to suggest a visit to an amazing bread/bakery stall outside Syon Park. If only I hadn’t been running with no bag or back pack! I think it might worth a special trip on a another day!

Boats at Richmond bridge

By the time I got back I was quite tired, and hungry. I really need to get myself sorted out better as far as food/ hydration goes on long runs. But after a substantial brunch of omelette and toast, and plenty of water and kefir I felt a lot better! And very satisfied that I managed to run 20km without total collapse!

Beautiful flowers at Syon Park
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Race Report! New Year Revolutions – here comes 2022

So – yesterday afternoon around 4 o’clock I decided to run a half marathon! Today! As you do. I have run this event before. In fact this event started my year of half marathons in 2019, and then I just had to do it again in 2020. It didn’t happen in 2021, so why not again in 2022?!

Before it started.

Run at Hillingdon Cycle Circuit it’s a timed run which means you can run any distance you can manage within 6 hours. Some people do marathons, some people ultras. Some run, some walk, some run/walk. One person today was in a wheelchair. It’s out and back loops – seven for a half marathon.

Ready to go!

Even though it’s the exact opposite type of run that I normally like (I.e. countryside trail runs) it’s curiously compelling. Meditative and mindless almost. The atmosphere is one of camaraderie, although there were a lot fewer people today than in previous years. There’s no sense of competition because everyone is running their own race in terms of time and distance. The cycle circuit is in a green space within a highly industrial and commercial area. Today there were two kites hovering for about half an hour overhead, and lots of other birds singing away. Ever changing skies remind me of the skies in Suffolk, which is really quite extraordinary when we are in deepest Hayes just a couple of miles from Heathrow!

So that’s the first half marathon of 2022. Done and dusted in 2 hours and 11 minutes! When’s the next one?!

Great medal and superb goody bag!
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Race Report – Ealing Half Marathon 2021

After a break due to global circumstances in 2020 the best half marathon in the world (yes, honestly) came back for 2021! And it did not disappoint.

Last year I ran it ‘virtually’ all by myself in Suffolk in the pouring rain. This year we were all back together in our thousands to run through the welcoming streets of Ealing on a warm autumn day with not a spot of rain.

I cycled to Lammas Park for the start and excitement grew as I went past the barriers all in place, and the runners walking and cycling in one direction – to the park!

Once I had left my bike securely parked I dropped off my bag at the tent and met some friends from Quit the Gym and waited for the warm up. I was feeling surprisingly nervous at this point, but I think it was mainly excitement really. I haven’t actually run 21km for quite a while, as the last half marathon I did in July was so hot that I walked most of it! And since then the longest run I have done is 18km.

However nowadays I run with no particular time goal in mind. I just like to get round and enjoy myself. And it was really fantastic to be running a proper half marathon with lots of people all around, and amazing support from the community. Because this is a run in my local area I always see lots of people I know which is great. It really is inspiring and motivating to have so many people out on the course cheering on the runners. The marshals are fab (one of my sons and several friends were volunteering as marshals this year) and always ready to encourage and help runners in trouble. It was warm today and quite a few people were overcome by the unexpected heat and humidity – I sincerely hope all are recovered.

I finished in 2 hours 5 minutes which I was very happy with. My best time on this course is just over 1 hour 58 minutes – but that was 5 years ago! I don’t think that’s going to happen again somehow.

The Ealing half marathon has a very special place in my heart – I have done almost all of them – just missed one. The atmosphere is amazing, and I think this is because it truly is a community event. The Saturday afternoon before the half marathon is devoted to children – there’s a family mile for under 5’s and a parent/carer, and then mile races for age groups up to 16. It’s become more and more popular each year, and places sell out quickly. I’m hoping to enter next year with my grandson (maybe even both of them!) who will be 26 months by then!

A lovely medal as usual.
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Run report – The World’s Largest Medal!

First let me say that I am using the word ‘run’ as applied to yesterday’s race very loosely. I don’t think I have ever walked as much in a race/run as I did at Denbies Wine Estate in Dorking with Phoenix Running. Why? The heat! It was so hot, already 17 deg C at 7.30am when I started, and rapidly rising to about 28 deg. In the baking heat of the sun – very welcome on a vineyard I am sure, but not so great if you’re running – a couple of hundred foolhardy/ brave/ plain crazy people ran laps to earn the biggest medal of all time!

I managed four laps, a half marathon, and by the last lap I was pretty much walking the whole time. In spite of drinking over a litre of fluids my legs were cramping so much I could hardly even walk, and I decided that no medal and no run was worth collapsing for. So ended the slowest 13.1 miles ever – my official time was 2 hours and 57 minutes!

Where’s the shade?!

The great thing about the Phoenix events is the friendliness of everyone, from Rik Vercoe the organiser, to the volunteers helping at the aid station, to Paul handing out the enormous medals from the back of a truck, to every participant. Absolutely everyone is there to offer encouragement and support, and try and make sure that a good time is had by all.

Race village. I found out later that the lady in the red hat just completed her 100th half marathon!

When I finally finished I practically inhaled an ice lolly from the tuck shop/ aid station and then got an iced coffee and a panini to refuel. And then it was time to take advantage of the vineyard shop to buy some sparkling wine, before heading home.

English sparkling wine is really very good!
Seriously bonkers medal 😂
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Yay! Finally! Race report! Wendover 21km

Hello everyone! Yes I am back. It’s been a while, hope you’ve all been well. All good here in Ealing, and I’m glad to be back running and writing again. And you never know I might do a bit of baking too.

Yesterday I ran my first proper hilly trail run in ages. So long ago I can’t remember when. Probably back in 2019 I think. I did a race in the Chilterns, Buckinghamshire, UK, and for anyone who knows the area – it’s hilly. That is certainly part of the charm (the views) but also part of the challenge (the pain).

Views from the top

In 2019, when I ran a half marathon (or near enough) every month throughout the year, I ran a wonderful race with race organiser Maverick. It was also in the Chiltern hills, a different bit, and it was amazing! Doing that run in 2019 made me realise that running out in proper countryside is what I really love. So I signed up for the same run in March 2020. And then it was postponed (of course) until March 2021. And then it was postponed again until July 2021 – but a date I couldn’t do. I changed my entry and ta-da – a run up hill and down dale for which I was not fully prepared – hahaha!

This run started at the civilised time of 10 o’clock. The weather was warm but not too hot, and a fresh breeze when out in the open was very welcome. We set off in waves of 5 or 6 people at a time to maintain social distancing. The route was well signed, and the marshals were all helpful and encouraging. At times in the woods I was running alone which was peaceful and calm. At other times runners were in front or behind, and all were friendly and supportive.

We ran through woods and fields, past pretty houses and farms. We ran up hills – well, no – we walked up the hills, and some of us also walked down the hills to avoid slipping on the chalky paths, or tripping on a tree root and flying down.

We ran past Chequers, the country home of the Prime Minister. We ran past a lot of HS2 works – the controversial high speed train line between London and the North. I saw many kites (the birds) hovering overhead, and heard larks singing their heads off.

That’s Chequers in the middle of the picture.

The flowers were beautiful – carpets of wild flowers on the open hillsides and tall foxgloves in the woods. One churchyard we ran through had roses all long the wall, which smelled fantastic.

The rather fab aid station

Now one thing you can guarantee when running along the Ridgeway, which is a long distance path that was part of our route, is amazing views. That is certainly the case at Coombe Hill, where the views across the countryside are expansive. There is a tall monument at the top of the hill, built in 1904 to remember the dead of the Boer War. As I approached the monument I saw a woman sitting on a bench looking upset. A fellow runner, it turned out she was almost frozen to the spot with vertigo and dizziness, from the huge views from such a height across Buckinghamshire. Eventually I persuaded her to come with me, and we slowly made our way parallel to the main path for a bit, the views shielded by trees. Then we ran along, with me on the right blocking the view as she carefully avoided looking anywhere but the ground in front of her. Finally we reached the woodland where she felt ok again. It was her first trail run – I hope it won’t be the last!

It seems cruel to plan a route where in the last 5 km there are 6 stiles to cross. My poor legs.

I made it to the finish in 2 hours 51 minutes, and my legs were killing me! The welcome at the end, plus a medal and an iced coffee, as well as a lager for later made it all worth it. And my lovely husband was there to drive me home. Which was a good thing because my left leg cramped up half way home, and still feels sore!

After months of running in familiar places it was so good to be out exploring a different area. My experience of Maverick events is that they are friendly, well organised, welcoming and fun. Bring on the next one!

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Sunday Long Runs

Last weekend I was in Suffolk. I stayed in my sister in law’s static caravan which she very generously shares with the family, for a couple of nights so that I could do a trail run nearby which was then postponed until November! Oh well I thought, I will just do a half marathon by myself on routes that I know well around Aldeburgh. A plan. Then I remembered another run postponed from last year happening today (May 2nd), and not relishing the thought of two half marathons on consecutive weekends I decided to shorten the Suffolk run to around 12km.

Last September I ran a half marathon in this area which I wrote about here. It is an area I know quite well by now, and a lovely place to walk or run.

Pathways:

And the sea!

What a beautiful run it was. So peaceful.

And then today I ran the first half marathon I’ve done since last September, and that weather dominated half in Suffolk when I ended up soaked through and frozen!

The run today was organised by Phoenix Running and was a repeat of the route I did last year in August (blog post here). Four laps out and back along the towpath at Walton-on-Thames equals a half marathon. I did wonder about doing another lap as it’s an event where you can do as much as you like in 7 hours. However after 21.1 km my legs said No! It was a another beautiful spring morning and there’s always lots to see along the river. People on paddle boards, rowing boats, motor boats and narrow boats. And of course lots of people cycling and walking.

I didn’t take a lot photos today but it was a really beautiful day as you can see.

Double the Force! Or two medals for the price of one!
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Look back – look forward – here comes 2021!

It’s come around again – the end of the year, and a time to reflect.

This time last year I was celebrating having achieved 12 half marathons (or the equivalent averaged out..) one per month. This year I am amazed that I have in fact done 2 actual real life, real time races! The first was in January, and I was hoping to do it again in 2021 to start the new year as I mean to go on, but it ain’t happening.

I have done quite a lot of running in 2020 even though I haven’t been able to take part in events with other runners as planned. I’m especially disappointed that two trail runs were cancelled, but hey, we all know why that was don’t we?

According to my Garmin stats I’ve run 1,171 km (727.6 miles). I think it’s a bit more than that as there were a few times when either I couldn’t locate my watch or it wasn’t charged! On Strava it’s 1,228 km but that includes a couple of bike rides. Whatever it is it’s quite a lot and I’m happy!

These 2 medals were the only ones for actual races. Both half marathons, one in January and one in August.
Two virtual runs. The first completed in January – 26.2 miles (42km) in January in aid of refugees. And another in June – running 50km in 7 days. That was tough.
Two more virtual runs, organised by the fabulous Phoenix Running. I did a half marathon on the day that would have been the London Marathon in April. And the other one was running every day for 7 days in July, which is not something I would usually do!
Three virtual runs with the truly wonderful Ealing Half marathon crew. I really loved all of these runs especially the parks one (Queen of the Suburbs) when I got to visit new places and wave at fellow participants!
And finally – a virtual Christmas Day run.

So what next for 2021? The two cancelled trail runs with Maverick have been postponed until spring, and we’ll see what happens. But next on the horizon – in fact starting tomorrow – is a whole month of Running Every Day (RED)!! Yes I decided that a week of running every day in the height of summer was not enough, and I must do it for 31 days straight. And for extra punishment 😉 I must do it in the coldest, darkest month. Hahaha, I hear you laughing!

I will be documenting this as an incentive to actually do it. I may not (almost certainly won’t) write a post every day but I will of course take lots of photos and let you know how it’s all going.

In the meantime – Happy New Year to all my lovely readers around the world. May 2021 bring us all peace and health. I shall continue to run and bake, and maybe occasionally post about some of the other things I like doing in my spare time.

Virtual race report – (not) the Ealing Half Marathon!

The second September challenge organised by Ealing Half Marathon was a virtual half marathon. Usually the Ealing half marathon takes place on the last Sunday of September. But as that cannot happen this year the challenge was to run or walk the distance in the week running up to 28th September. The distance did not have to be completed in one go, but I decided that I would do it as one run. It is four weeks since the last time I ran this distance, and the conditions today were a far cry from that day!

I’m back in Suffolk this week, a week in Thorpeness postponed from summer. I love it here, I love the big skies and sea, the old fashioned feel of the houses and the peacefulness of the countryside. What better place to run the not-in-Ealing half marathon? And it was a wonderful run, even if the weather could have been kinder, and by the end I could hardly move my frozen soaked feet, and my hands were so cold I could hardly take off my shoes and socks!

This morning it was all about water. Rain, sea, puddles, river, lake, boating pond. Water, and wind. Yes the weather was a prominent feature of today’s running adventure.

It was all about the weather today.

I started out at about 7.30 before the worst of the forecasted rain and wind. The relatively light rain became heavier quite quickly however, and then it was just non stop heavy rain with accompanying wind whenever I was out in the open. After a while my fingers were so cold and wet I could no longer operate my phone, and so photos were nigh on impossible. And anyway it would be yet another picture of endless East Anglian grey skies and rain.

My run started from the Airbnb house where we are staying and I headed towards Aldeburgh. Just before the town on the shingle beach is Maggi Hambling’s (controversial) sculpture of a scallop shell called A conversation with the sea, dedicated to Benjamin Britten. The words are from his opera Peter Grimes:

I hear those voices that will not be drowned.

It’s an interesting sentence to reflect upon.

Personally I love this sculpture, and find it hard to believe that some people still want it removed…

In Aldeburgh there’s a boating pond where, in good weather, lots of children (and a few adults) love to spend a happy hour sailing toy boats looked over by the faithful dog Snooks.

Snooks – kitted out for Covid-19 🙁

I headed through town in back streets to avoid the wind, and then got blasted at the estuary, with its wide open space. Past the allotments, now looking very autumnal, with dahlias and chrysanthemums, sodden in the rain but still bright and cheerful.

The river Alde estuary. Bleak today.

Next was the railway path. The railway was dismantled in the 1960’s. During ‘lockdown’ I came across a beautiful soundscape of the railway path by sound recordist Chris Watson which you can listen to by clicking here. Put your headphones on, shut your eyes and relax. It really is wonderful.

I’ve run along this path so many times! I think this has to be the wettest though. I wasn’t even half way through yet… 😂

I did a loop off the railway path that took me round the marshy area and through the woods. Seriously wet now and long past trying to avoid any puddles, my feet were completely soaked. In fact everything was soaked. I cheered myself up by thinking that at least it wasn’t hail. (When training for the London marathon in 2016 my longest training run ended with rain that turned to hail about a mile and half from home. Never forgotten.)

I was then back in Thorpeness, but still had about 7 km to go before the distance was complete, so I headed for the coast path. An obstacle lay in the way – flood alert! It really was beginning to feel like Britten’s Noye’s Fludde!

I did manage to find a relatively dry way round this the first time round, but when I came across it a second time just metres from the ‘finish line’ I couldn’t be bothered and just sploshed through ankle deep in icy water.

On I went along the coast path, past the place where the sandy cliff has recently collapsed onto the beach, and then down onto the beach itself running towards Sizewell. Everywhere seemed deserted. Sensible people staying indoors.

Finally, after another little lap of Thorpeness to complete the 21 km, I got back 2 hours 15 minutes later – drenched. To be honest I did not feel good at that point! Pleased, but not exactly happy! However after a warm shower, bacon and egg sandwich and a cup of coffee I felt a great deal better!

Not exactly smiling am I?!

Thank you Sandra and Christine at Ealing Half Marathon for organising two fab events. I have loved these September challenges. Even though it was a completely different experience from previous Ealing half marathons I still got that #ealingfeeling here in rainy Suffolk!

Real Race Report – Party Train!

Today was my first foray into a post-lockdown organised running event with Phoenix Running. It was an interesting experience. Instead of lots of runners all congregating together before the run, registering in the leisure centre, gathering on the towpath and setting off together as it was when I was last down here in December, there was a very different system.

Base camp

The first big difference is that the event started much earlier than usual time of 9 or 9.30. Because runners started at staggered times in groups of six the first group set off at 6.45am today, and then subsequent groups at 10 minute intervals. My start time was 7.45, which was a bit more acceptable than 6.45 to my mind! To avoid contact as much as possible we did not register in the usual way but as we arrived just told Rik who we were. Then we had to stand 2m in front of an infrared camera set at 37.5 deg C. As long our temperature showed less than that we were ok to run. Then we stood on yellow discs spaced 2m apart to wait for our start time.

It’s a private house now, but I’m guessing this was the lock keepers house once.

As you may know I have a ‘thing’ about race toilet facilities 😉 and was very concerned because in the very detailed email we received a few days ago NO mention was made of toilets! Yikes! However it was ok because the pub The Weir, which is right next to where Rik sets up his base, had opened its doors really early to allow us to use the toilet! (But not to have a drink..)

On the first lap I was in a bit of a dream and managed to miss the turning point – luckily I realised after about 25m! So that’s an extra 50m!
Sunbury lock

Although I have not run 21km since 7th June I decided that a half marathon distance would be my goal. That’s four laps, out and back. Of course I started out way too quickly! The first 10km I did in 57 minutes. It was all downhill from there (figuratively speaking – the towpath is totally flat!). The second half was really hard work, and I ended up walking bits, and stopping to take photos just to give my legs a rest. Final official time was 2:16:40. That’s ok!

Sunbury lock
Wouldn’t it be lovely to live over there?

It was perfect weather, and so lovely to run along the riverside, especially a part that I don’t know. The lap went east along the river from Walton on Thames towards Hampton Court, past Sunbury Lock. There is always lots to look at when running along a river, and this morning was no exception: several boats went through the lock, lots of scullers and rowers, and even some paddle boarders. I also like to look at all the beautiful houses whose gardens run down to the river, and imagine myself living there!

The main reason I did this run. Such a cool medal. There’s another Party Train run in Sept 13th – I could pick up a carriage to link onto the engine.. tempting!

Thank you to everyone who has read my previous post about Joseph, and thank you so much for donating. I will get an update next week on how much has been raised to help with Joseph’s health costs.